Johan F

Thingvellir Archaeologist Margret Hallmundsdottir on Iceland's Heritage

Can some of the world's toughest people also be the best story-tellers? In a revealing Q&A, meet Icelandic archaeologist Margret Hallmundsdottir, who gives us a window into Iceland as a country, and into our shared human condition--that we are all shaped by our cultural landscapes. Margret offers insight into the character of Icelanders, and history lessons on Iceland's epic sagas that depict historical events from the Viking Age; Thingvellir National Park, a UNESCO heritage site where the country's forms of government and religion evolved; a day in the life of an archaeologist.

Thingvellir Archaeologist Margret Hallmundsdottir on Iceland's Heritage

The Dala Horse and Swedish Identity

How does folk art embody a culture's history and identity? Scandinavia's Dala Horse offers some insight into how a mode of survival becomes a beloved symbol of a country's ideals and values. Since the Stone-Age, horses have been high valued possessions in Scandinavia and were the difference between life or death throughout the region's roadless plains. Take a ride with BCD through the history of the Dala Horse & meet the artisans keeping this beloved custom alive!

The Dala Horse and Swedish Identity

Jantes Law: A Countryside Beast Headed for Extinction?

All cultures have a social code, even if the code hasnt been given a formal name. 'Jante's Law' is Scandinavia's term for a set of cultural mores that values the community ahead of the individual. Its original meaning, adopted from a 1933 novel, related to no-one being anonymous in a small community. Over time, Jante's Law evolved into a derogatory reference to individualism and an attitude that it is safer to blend in with the crowd than stand out from it. Find out what six local Scandinavians think this term really means and their views on its relevance today.

Jantes Law: A Countryside Beast Headed for Extinction?